Photo 20 Jan We might say that we don’t know how to think of the connection between a photograph and what it is a photograph of. The image is not a likeness; it is not exactly a replica, or a relic, or a shadow, or an apparition either, though all of these natural candidates share a striking feature with photographs—an aura or history of magic surrounding them. One might wonder that similar questions do not arise about recordings of sound. I mean, on the whole we would be hard put to find it false or paradoxical to say, listening to a record, “That’s an English horn”; there is no trace of temptation to add (as it were, to oneself), “But I know it’s really only a recording.” Why? A child might be very puzzled by the remark, said in the presence of a phonograph, “That’s an English horn,” if something else had already been pointed out to him as an English horn. Similarly, he might be very puzzled by the remark, said of a photograph, “That’s your grandmother.” Very early, children are no longer puzzled by such remarks, luckily. But that doesn’t mean we know why they were puzzled, or why they no longer are. And I am suggesting that we don’t know either of these things about ourselves.

We might say that we don’t know how to think of the connection between a photograph and what it is a photograph of. The image is not a likeness; it is not exactly a replica, or a relic, or a shadow, or an apparition either, though all of these natural candidates share a striking feature with photographs—an aura or history of magic surrounding them.
One might wonder that similar questions do not arise about recordings of sound. I mean, on the whole we would be hard put to find it false or paradoxical to say, listening to a record, “That’s an English horn”; there is no trace of temptation to add (as it were, to oneself), “But I know it’s really only a recording.” Why? A child might be very puzzled by the remark, said in the presence of a phonograph, “That’s an English horn,” if something else had already been pointed out to him as an English horn. Similarly, he might be very puzzled by the remark, said of a photograph, “That’s your grandmother.” Very early, children are no longer puzzled by such remarks, luckily. But that doesn’t mean we know why they were puzzled, or why they no longer are. And I am suggesting that we don’t know either of these things about ourselves.

Link 4 May In Bucharest, neighborhoods formed their own networks in order to bypass incumbents and meet their own needs. »
Link 4 May An Exploration of Deleuze and Guattari’s Concept of the Rhizome»

"After having a conversation on the phone with Burroughs in 1968, Giorno initiated the Dial-A-Poem Poets concept, which he claimed would later influence the creation of information services creation over the telephone, such as sports and stock market. Fifteen phone lines were connected with individual answering machines: people would call Giorno Poetry Systems and listen to a poem they were offered from fragments of various live recordings. Dial-A-Poem, from 1969 on, was very successful, with 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and 8.30 p.m. to 11.30 p.m. peaks. GPS used a variety of social issues at the time, what with the sexual revolution and the Vietnam War, which would create appeal as well as shock from the reactive community

Text 4 May Highlights of a Career in Surveillance* : a Colloquial Memoir — MTC Cronin

"ADVICE

   1. Be your own soldier.
   2. ars est celare artem [1]
   3. The rooster has become too distant. If the opportunity for betrayal is blocked, so too what thought might stop it.
   4. Be alert to the moods, the archetypes — they contain all and the nothing that frightens with its silence, the sound of death.
   5. To have a small thing takes a lot of people.
   6. Quotation from Reality (p222, Between Confrontation & Love) “This trust, is in herself. In her body. In the grimace, the citric pain. In the whites of her eyes rolling back to reveal the yolk which sits inside pleasure. Trust is the hyphen. In egg-white, egg-yolk, in stepping-stone, loose-knit. And, she thinks — carrying her full basket, (of eggs, of mangoes, bears, of things with the name of the intruder) — one that gives is the strongest.”

 A CHILDHOOD NOT OUT OF THE ORDINARY

We all start off as spies.
Ask any seven year old playing with a four year old.
Those who keep at it become novelists; those who are caught out, journalists and philosophers; those whose hearts break upon leaving this first past behind, poets, actors etc etc.
All other occupations are simply variations (though not really on a theme — more on a method). Viz., the painter and the photographer, not to mention lawyers, police, doctors, supermarket workers…
I was not as adept at it as my sister who ferreted numerous tiny folded and then folded again pieces of paper into the crevices of my parents’ furniture and home. She did it so well that she is now Hecuba in a timely Women of Troy. [2] She sits bolt upright in the bed at night and screams ‘Do not let Paris enter!’ [sic] [3] That she is taken seriously can be proven by the reporting of her sleeptalking (for that is surely what it must be) in a suburban paper [4] which even printed a very large photo of her head at an odd angle — one might say ‘cocked’ ready for war.
Further watching of her movements [5], or might we posit Hecuba’s? — spies always watch other spies — is illustrated by reports in major newspapers of the country [6], reports written by agents who are aware of the duplicity of my sister, who know hers is but a role, but who seem to have a not-perfect idea of how well she is in fact playing it.
…”

http://www.rhizomes.net/issue6/cronin.htm#a1

Link 4 May Living In The U.X.A»

At the height of the Great Depression, a group of unemployed Oakland workers decided to take matters into their own hands. The system wasn’t working, so they set up their own system. Money was nearly worthless, so they decided to live by barter. They called themselves the Unemployed Exchange Association and they soon went on to write a remarkable chapter in American economic history. This is their story.

Photo 4 May Always Split Test
Photo 31 Mar There’s a new art and literary magazine — one with a twist: Everyone  connected with it —  the artists, writers, editors and producers — are  presently or were recently guards at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.   The guards you see at museums may seem like ciphers standing silently in  their blue uniforms, and only speaking when you ask a question or get  too near that work of art. But the 35 artists showcased in this journal  give the world a very different picture of themselves.
The  magazine is called Sw!pe, and it’s named for people who clock  in and out of their jobs.  Jason Eskenazi was a guard at the Met until  last November. He says that one day, when he was standing around at his  job feeling a bit bored, he thought, “You know, the guards really matter  in this museum, and so I walked over to a co-worker, and I said, ‘Dave,  we should do a magazine called Guards Matter.’ “

On Sw!pe's back cover is a copy of a letter written to The  New York Times in 1915, talking about the “unnecessary cruelty” of  making museum guards stand for hours during the day. It’s something you  don’t usually notice when you visit a museum, but it will be hard for  anyone, after looking at this art and this journal, not to notice it  from now on.

There’s a new art and literary magazine — one with a twist: Everyone connected with it — the artists, writers, editors and producers — are presently or were recently guards at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The guards you see at museums may seem like ciphers standing silently in their blue uniforms, and only speaking when you ask a question or get too near that work of art. But the 35 artists showcased in this journal give the world a very different picture of themselves.

The magazine is called Sw!pe, and it’s named for people who clock in and out of their jobs. Jason Eskenazi was a guard at the Met until last November. He says that one day, when he was standing around at his job feeling a bit bored, he thought, “You know, the guards really matter in this museum, and so I walked over to a co-worker, and I said, ‘Dave, we should do a magazine called Guards Matter.’ “

On Sw!pe's back cover is a copy of a letter written to The New York Times in 1915, talking about the “unnecessary cruelty” of making museum guards stand for hours during the day. It’s something you don’t usually notice when you visit a museum, but it will be hard for anyone, after looking at this art and this journal, not to notice it from now on.

Quote 31 Mar 42 notes
‘WORLD WAR THREE WILL BE A GUERRILLA INFORMATION WAR WITH NO DIVISION BETWEEN MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PARTICIPATION’ ~ Marshall McLuhan, 1968
— (via criminalwisdom)
Quote 31 Mar

"In Mexico City in 1976, a twenty-three year-old with wild hair and aviator glasses stood
up in the Librería Gandhi, one of the bookstores that unwittingly supplied him with free
books, and read a manifesto urging his fellow poets to give up everything for literature, to
follow the example of Rimbaud and hit the road. The true poet, he said, should abandon
the coffeehouse and take the part of “the sharpshooters, the lonesome cowboys … , the
spat-upon supermarket shoppers in their massive individual collective disjunctives”—the
cunning, the lonely, the unnoticed and despised.”

- Natasha Wimmer, translator of The Savage Detectives and 2666

Photo 27 Mar 2 notes giddyparanoia:

Tio Sam Derrotado / Uncle Sam Defeated (via camilo.mazuera)

giddyparanoia:

Tio Sam Derrotado / Uncle Sam Defeated (via camilo.mazuera)

Photo 26 Mar Depending on how you look at it this is either an unfortunate or  intriguing attack on a Os Gemeos, Nunca, Nina, Finok, and Zefix Mural in  Sao Paulo. Choque Photos who has provided  the pictures on their flickr has provided this description:
On  18 March a group of Pixadores attacked a mural painted by OSGEMEOS,  NUNCA, NINA, Finok, and Zefix, which was sponsored by the city hall of  Sao Paulo and cost R$ 200,000 to state coffers ( $ 100.000 U.S.  dollars). The following sentence was written beyond the Pixações: “R$  200,000 in Makeup, and the city is in calamity,”.Last month, for  more than 30 days it rained non-stop in the city, and countless poor  communities were flooded. Many of these communities did not receive any  help from the City hall of Sao Paulo even after 3 weeks. However, the  mural was all cleaned in the same night, by a huge team of City Hall by  using sponges and hydraulic cranes.The mayor of Sao Paulo, after  creating the project “Clean City” in 2006, which erased much of the  illegal Graffitis and Pixações of the city, is funding with public funds  many projects of LEGAL Graffitis with Famous writers, in order to  silence the critics and manipulating public opinionThis is the  same group that raided the University of Fine Arts, Choque Cultural  Gallery, 28th Sao Paulo Biennial in 2008.
Juxtapoz Magazine -

Depending on how you look at it this is either an unfortunate or intriguing attack on a Os Gemeos, Nunca, Nina, Finok, and Zefix Mural in Sao Paulo. Choque Photos who has provided the pictures on their flickr has provided this description:

On 18 March a group of Pixadores attacked a mural painted by OSGEMEOS, NUNCA, NINA, Finok, and Zefix, which was sponsored by the city hall of Sao Paulo and cost R$ 200,000 to state coffers ( $ 100.000 U.S. dollars). The following sentence was written beyond the Pixações: “R$ 200,000 in Makeup, and the city is in calamity,”.

Last month, for more than 30 days it rained non-stop in the city, and countless poor communities were flooded. Many of these communities did not receive any help from the City hall of Sao Paulo even after 3 weeks. However, the mural was all cleaned in the same night, by a huge team of City Hall by using sponges and hydraulic cranes.

The mayor of Sao Paulo, after creating the project “Clean City” in 2006, which erased much of the illegal Graffitis and Pixações of the city, is funding with public funds many projects of LEGAL Graffitis with Famous writers, in order to silence the critics and manipulating public opinion

This is the same group that raided the University of Fine Arts, Choque Cultural Gallery, 28th Sao Paulo Biennial in 2008.

Juxtapoz Magazine -

Link 26 Mar 2 notes A Mere Outline for One Aspect of a Book on Mystery Catalysts, Guerrilla Playfare, booed usic, Mad Scientist Didactions, Acts of As-Beenism, So-Called Whatevers, Psychopathfinding, Uncerts, etc..»

"tENTATIVELY, a cONVENIENCE was born at age 21 in 1975 Era Vulgari in BalTimOre, usa. It was at this time that he decided that he was a Mad Scientist / d-composer / Sound Thinker / Thought Collector. Since then he has been active with the Krononautic Organism (a time travellers’ society), Nuclear Brain Physics Surgery School, the Neoast?! ‘Patanational Cultural Conspiracy,’ the Church of the SubGenius (in which he’s a saint), etc. Whenever he has the energy he devotes himself to “undermining ‘reality’ maintenance traps” through attempting to apply the maxism "Anything is Anything.” These days this is usually manifested by being a Psychopathfinder & a Jack-Off-Of-All-Trades.”


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